A Look Behind Skogaholm Manor

Skogaholm Manor

Skogaholm Manor, Jane Nearing

Skogaholm Manor is a large mansion built in the Caroline style in 1680,  located at Skansen in Stockholm.

Skogaholm Manor, forms part of the open air museum at Skansen where it stands as an example of an 18th century Swedish manor house.  The manor’s main building was donated in 1929 to the Nordic Museum and moved from Svennevads parish in southeast Närke.

The manor house was built around 1690 for Catherine Rosenberg and her husband Anders Wennerberg Manor, who inherited Skogaholm after her parents Simon Rosenberg and Margaret Larsdotter, and had visible colored red timber with white trim.

Skansen Air Museum is located on the island Djurgården in Stockholm, Sweden. It was founded in 1891 by Artur Hazelius (1833–1901) as a way to show life in the different parts of Sweden before the industrial era. Hazelius bought around 150 houses from all over the country, and had them shipped piece by piece to the museum, where they were rebuilt to provide a unique picture of traditional Sweden. Only three of the buildings in the museum are not original, and were painstakingly copied from examples he had found.

All of the buildings are open to visitors and show the full range of Swedish life from the Skogaholm Manor house built in 1680, to the 16th century Älvros farmhouses. Skansen attracts more than 1.3 million visitors each year and many of the exhibits cover over the 75 acre (300,000 m²) with a full replica of an average 19th-century town, in which craftsmen in traditional dress such as tanners, shoemakers, silversmiths, bakers and glass-blowers demonstrate their skills in period surroundings.

  • Skansen Air Museum,Djurgarden 49-51, Stockholm 115 93, Sweden

Other Interesting Links:

Skogaholm Manor – The Interior Archive

Skogaholm Manor, Madame Berg Blog

The Skogaholm Manor – Skansen- Bittelitens Blog

The Skogaholm manor – Skansen – Cision

Skansen, Skogaholm Manor Panorama Pictures – 360Cities

Skansen- Johan Schuisky Pinterest

Skansen – Traditional Sweden in Miniature – PBase.com

 

Interesting Reviews:

“I have visited Skansen some times some years ago, and I enjoyed this revisit. The guides are excellent providers of information, and the interiors are cleverly reconstructed along with matching dresses of the guides. Statarlångan, Helsingslandsstugan, the ironware shop, Konsum shop … every house and shop have its past and worth while a visit. Petissan is a small, picturesque cafe where we enjoyed a cup of coffee and a variety of cakes. The carpenter’s workshop and the knowledgeable guide made me especially happy.” kanute07

“We made the mistake of not preparing for our visit. We had no idea of the size of the property, 75 acres, or of the number of historic buildings, 150! Thus, we did not leave enough time to properly watch the artisans at work, or talk to the interpreters in their traditional dress. Our hour and a half just skimmed the surface of what there was to see. We also made the mistake of not arriving at the main gate, and had to take a funicular railway. Thus, we missed the 15 shops in The Town Centre. The best time to visit is obviously not in mid-week in September, when activity is winding down, and the buildings begin closing at 5 pm. The free map is also essential!” Billitchyfeet

“This open-air museum is a collection of Swedish stuff. Swedish animals, Swedish housing across time and places, Swedish traditional clothing, everything. They even have real-size replica of a traditional old Swedish village from the 17th century. The Swedish animals are awesome! Make sure to go around 3:00 PM, it’s the animals’ feeding time.” John J

Summerhouse of Swedenborg Source- Wikipedia

Summerhouse of Swedenborg Source- Wikipedia

Graeme & Ann's 2010 Trip Stockholm

Graeme & Ann’s 2010 Trip: Skogaholm Manor

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Akerö in Södermanland, Sweden

Carl Gustaf Tessin

In the region of Bettna there are Manor houses abound, the most famous being Åkerö, beautifully positioned on the shores of lake Yngaren. The old mother tree to the famous Åkerö apple still stands in the gardens.    The castle has its own apple variety. The parent tree was planted in 1759 and still stands in the park and gives fruit every year.  Buildings have been on the property since the 1200s.  Several of the farm’s owners have belonged to Sweden’s most distinguished noble families;  Natt och Dag, Tott, Sture and Bielke.

In the mid 1500’s  a castle was built with turrets and towers that are depicted in Dahlberg’s “Suecia Antiqua”.  A part of the palace was burned a hundred years later and never refurbished.

The members of the Tessin family have been important in Swedish history. Nicodemus Tessin the Elder arrived there in 1636 and, alongside Jean de Vallée, became the country’s leading architect. His most famous work is Drottningholm Palace, which was completed by his son, Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, an even more significant architect whose major work is the Royal Palace in Stockholm. Nicodemus the Younger’s son, Carl Gustaf Tessin, was formally in charge of completing the Royal Palace, but was more noted as a diplomat and politician than as an architect. Carl Gustaf was one of the founders of the Hat Party and became one of the 1700s most important politicians with titles such as councilors, top Marshall and the Office of the President, the latter equal to the prime minister.

Carl-Gustaf Tessin purchased Åkerö in 1748.   Carl-Gustaf Tessin was then superintendent of the Royal Palace . The architect Carl Harleman was good friends with Tessin, and when CG Tessin wanted to retire from political life, they settled on the land and hired Carl Harleman. Harleman then designed the main building and proposed two wings. The result was one of the most beautiful rococo seats were filled with art treasures of Europe’s leading artists. As ambassador in Paris and during trips to Italy and Vienna had CG Tessin acquired a sound knowledge of architecture and art.

 Åkerö manor is beautifully surrounded by water from all sides. Beautiful maples, ash and linden trees are planted all around. Wall paintings, mirrors, door lintels, floors and countless antiques fill the space of the castle. .  The National Museum has a large part of Tessin’s art collection at the Royal Library in Stockholm. Nowadays, concerts are put on at Åkerö Manor in cooperation with Södermanlands Music & Theater.

There are not many pictures of Akerö, just these three below

Akerö in Södermanland, Sweden- Picture 1

Akerö in Södermanland, Sweden- Picture 2

Akerö in Södermanland, Sweden- Picture 3

Books Available on Amazon:

Nicodemus Tessin the Elder: Architecture in Sweden in the Age of Greatness

Nicodemus Tessin the Elder was an architect, gentleman, and founder of the artistic dynasty that was immensely influential at the Swedish court in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He was architect to the crown, to the nobility, and to the city of Stockholm, and he supplied buildings for a wide range of functions, from palaces to banks, courthouses, and fortifications. His unusually extensive travels in the Netherlands, Italy, France and Germany provided him with a comprehensive picture of contemporary European architecture, which he drew on as he synthesized a new group of buildings that would attract
international attention as models for princely architecture. His productivity required a new approach to architecture, and he was part of the first generation of architects in northern Europe to develop the architectural studio, distinguishing the design process from the business of building, and in the
process recreating himself as the modern architect.

Essays on Scandinavian History

This book examines important aspects of the history of Sweden and its Nordic neighbors between the later eighteenth and the beginning of the twenty-first century. Historian H. Arnold Barton has selected thirteen of the numerous essays  he has published over the past forty years on the history of Scandinavia.

This is a companion volume to Barton’s The Old Country and the New, an essay collection on Swedish emigration and the Swedes in America. Included here are studies of the special significance of the eighteenth century in Sweden’s history and culture, the relationship of King Gustaf III to the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, the impact of the American Revolution in Sweden, and Gustaf III’s ambitions in the East Baltic region. Also detailed are the king’s early reaction to the French Revolution and his efforts to
organize a European coalition to crush it, a reassessment of the reign and internal reforms of Gustaf IV Adolf, and the Swedish succession crises of 1809 and 1810.

In addition, Barton examines the increasing tension between the Pan-Scandinavian movement and the rising Finnish national movement. He deals with the historians of the Danish Agrarian Reforms of 1784-1814, parallel developments in Finland and Norway between 1808 and 1917, the discovery of Norway abroad, Swedish national romanticism, and Sweden’s transition from a warfare state to a welfare
state, now exemplifying the rational and humane ideals of the twentieth century.

Essays on Scandinavian History highlights important topics in the history of the Scandinavian region, which has remained all too little known outside the Nordic lands themselves, while also offering broader perspectives on Europe since the mid-eighteenth century. Twelve keyed-to-text illustrations, a bibliography of Barton’s publications on Scandinavian history, essay endnotes, and an index augment this work.

A ‘musical’ Trompe l’oeil in one of the rooms of Akerö in Södermanland,

Sweden with a Rococo “Bonheur du Jour” Picture Credit –La Pouyette Blog

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Book Review: The Swedish Wooden House by Lars Sjoberg

The-Swedish-House-Book

The Swedish Wooden House by Lars Sjoberg  and Ingalill Snitt shows magnificent castles, impressive mansions and simple farmhouses. The beauty and decay in all these houses are an important part of our heritage. The Swedish Wooden House journeys through Swedish architectural history and a rich source of inspiration for all who appreciate the beauty of the ancient buildings.

All these pictures were captured by Ingalill Snitt’s website.  You can buy this book on amazon for under $25-30 dollars, and the same as ebay.

Among the buildings shown are Sörby mansion, with its intact eighteenth-century painted-linen wall coverings; the numerous residences of the De la Gardie family, including Läckö Castle, founded as a bishop’s stronghold in the thirteenth century; Gunnebo, a lavish wooden interpretation of an Italian villa built for wealthy merchant John Hall; and several buildings associated with the  great Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus: Råshult, his childhood home; Sveden, the site of his wedding; and Hammarby, his adult home, complete with study, lecture pulpit, and collection cabinet. A celebration of a centuries-old design history as well as a source of design inspiration, The Swedish House captures the  special qualities of a unique building practice.

Editorial Review – Reed Business Information (c) 2003

Deserted farmhouses and unpainted wood houses, churches, and historic country estates are the focus of this engaging study of Swedish domestic architecture since the 17th century. Traditional designs, construction techniques, custom fittings, and renovations are examined, with an emphasis on interior decoration, furnishings, and various Continental influences. Examples range from humble rural structures to the renovated S rby mansion, with its painted 18th-century linen wall coverings and tile stove. Residences of the botanist Carl Linnaeus are featured, including his estate of Hammarby, with its study, lecture pulpit, and collection cabinet. Evocative, “certain slant of light” photos exquisitely capture exteriors in every season as well as interior details. An earlier, well-received collaboration by Sjoberg (curator, National Museum, Stockholm) and Snitt is The Swedish Room. Site maps, a bibliography, and an index would have enhanced this publication, but because there is so little in English on traditional Swedish residences, this work is recommended for collections of all levels.-Russell T. Clement, Northwestern Univ. Lib., Evanston, IL

By Lupo Montegrigio (Stockholm, Sweden) This review is from: The Swedish House

The Swedish (original) edition is titled “Swedish wooden houses” which is quite an essential piece of information for a buyer. That’s what’s linking the humblest farmers hut with a grand manor in this book. The emphasis is on interiors and a few are more than slightly deteriorating into a romantic peeling-paint-and-wallpaper inferno, but mainly it’s a fair selection of different types of rooms. Exteriors are also presented and I think there is a good balance. Photograps are excellent as always when Ingalill Snitt provides them.

ByM. Keane (Massachusetts) This review is from: The Swedish House

Sjoberg is the quintessential art historian and his book captures the history and soul of Swedish architecture beautifully. The photos and related text guide you through a brief history of the traditional houses and building styles found in Sweden. By looking thoughtfully at the photos, you’ll get a clear view of how these houses are constructed and why they are still standing today after years of abandonment and neglect. If you ever visit Sweden (and go beyond Skansen in Stockholm), you’ll see these “silent houses” throughout the countryside. Sjoberg brings them back to life with his deep understanding of their history and relevance to the 21st Century.

By PK (Minneapolis) Review is from: The Swedish House (Hardcover)

I’d hoped for more “Swedish” and “House.” The compositions of aged paint and abandoned objects in natural light are beautiful, but not necessarily “Swedish.” It’s mostly rooms. With some shots of fenestration, it contains only about 20 large photos showing the exterior of a whole “house.”

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