Pair of Late Gustavian Neoclassical Chairs

Pair of Late Gustavian / Neoclassical Chairs

Jason Phillips

The Scandinavians are known around the world for creating simple, stylish and functional furniture; its style reflects its origins, furniture and décor which maximized the available light and space. The look is minimal, yet honest with an earthy flavor. It is the perfect style to use when you are looking to revitalize an old, gloomy house and create a contemporary yet practical flare. To really get the 1800s Swedish feel in your home you will need to follow these tips:

Wooden Flooring

The flooring should be light and preferably wood, although a laminate will have the same effect. This allows the sunlight entering the house to bounce around the room and help to create a feeling of space, warmth and light. The bathroom is the only exception to this rule as a darker, warmer color will make the room feel more inviting.

Color Palettes Of Brown And Grey

The original Scandinavian design would be for white walls and a pale grey or light blue; either as a feature wall or as part of the design; the color of the furniture or the accessories. However, there have been several other influences in the Scandinavian scene and it is possible to introduce some bright colors through the accessories or even the flowers in the room. These will draw the eye and make the room feel friendly and inviting. It is also possible to opt for wood on one of the walls; it is a natural material and adds a layer of warmth to the property. If the wood is too yellow for your taste than it can be white washed or you can use grey oil to dilute the color.

Furniture Lines

The handmade designer furniture you use in your Scandinavian room must have clean lines. The majority of Swedish furniture elements will already have the lines you require. This simplistic approach will provide a calm, tranquil room in which to relax.

Functional Furniture

The Swedish pride themselves on providing stylish yet functional furniture. Every piece has a specific purpose and it is well designed for that purpose. This ethic should apply across the entire house; it avoids unnecessary clutter and encourages the simple, minimalistic style. Furniture may have been designed recently or may be genuine antique pieces. Either will work as the elements of design have stayed true throughout time; every Swedish piece has a classic beauty in its simplicity and will sit perfectly in a room today. The way this furniture has been designed allows it to blend with any room, creating a stylish, yet practical living area.

Corner Fire

Swedish winters are generally much colder than those in many other parts of the world. A fire is an essential part of surviving these winters. However, they are not the feature point of the room; they are seen as another piece of furniture. Swedish fires are often tiled and sit in the corner of the room. They are usually very simple in design and may hardly even be noticed with their doors closed. The corner approach also allows the heat to radiate out across the room effectively.

The Environment

The Swedish are well known for adding environmentally friendly features to their houses. This can be as simply as embracing the energy efficient light bulbs, to adding solar panels or a ground source heat pump. Insulation and triple glazing are also standard on new builds and help to create the warm, inviting interior of a Swedish house.

Less is more

Scandinavian design does not incorporate an abundance of ornaments and accessories. The approach is minimalistic in order to keep the clean lines and bright spaces that they desire. Among the few accessories will usually be a plant or bunch of flowers to add a touch of the outside to the décor. Blend your minimalistic approach with natural materials and you will have a beautiful house that you can
actually live in!

Embrace the Swedish home design and transform your home into a welcoming, truly inviting living nest. Choose a dominant color that best lives up to your expectations, and don’t be afraid to improvise. Oversized throw pillows, flower pots with seasonal flowers and custom-made furniture items are everything you need for a Swedish-inspired home.

A Swedish Early Gustavian Period Console Table circa 1770 1st dibs

A Swedish Early Gustavian Period Console Table circa 1770 1st dibs

19th Century Swedish Gustavian Pedestal Table

19th Century Swedish Gustavian Pedestal Table

Set of Four 18th Century Swedish Gustavian Chairs

Set of Four 18th Century Swedish Gustavian Chairs

19th Century Swedish Gustavian Style Bench

19th Century Swedish Gustavian Style Bench

Swedish Antiques By D.LARSSON

Swedish Antiques By dlarssoninterior.com/

Swedish Antiques By D.LARSSON

18th c. Swedish Rococo Cabinet By dlarssoninterior.com/

Swedish Antiques By dlarssoninterior

Swedish Antiques By dlarssoninterior.com/

Master Henriks Gustavian Furniture

Master Henriks- Instagram

Swedish Furniture

A Swedish Gustavian Period Sideboard, Pair Of 19th Century Swedish Gustavian Sconces, Gustavian Chandelier, circa 1790, 19th Century Gustavian Clock , Pair of Gustavian Girandoles, Swedish Gustavian Chandelier

Set of Ten 19th Century Antique Swedish Dining Chairs

Set of Ten 19th Century Antique Swedish Dining Chairs

Swedish 18th Century Late Gustavian Cabinet With Orginal Paint

Swedish 18th Century Late Gustavian Cabinet With Original Paint

Gustavian Chest of Drawers

Gustavian Chest of Drawers

Swedish Gustavian blue painted slat back dining chairs from 1790

Swedish Gustavian blue painted slat back dining chairs from 1790

Gustavian Style Settee at 1stdibs

Gustavian Style Settee at 1stdibs

Solgården

Solgården solgarden.se

Solgården.png

Solgården solgarden.se

Swede Furniture

Swede Furniture swedefurniture.com

Set of 8 Vintage Gustavian Dining Chairs

Set of 8 Vintage Gustavian Dining Chairs

Swedish Furniture

Gustavian Sofa in Original Paint, Baltic Hutch Painted Gustavian, A Swedish, Gustavian, settee at 1stdibs, Period Gustavian Secretary, 19th Century Pair of Swedish Demilune Tables, 18th century Swedish Gustavian Daybed, Antique Gustavian Daybed, circa 1790